Sep 192015
 

The right to vote… ahhh. We didn’t get it, we weren’t given it, we FOUGHT tooth and nail for it. Way back in the 1600s, a little know FEMALE lawyer named Margaret Brent was laughed out of a Maryland courthouse for asking – no, demanding – the right to vote. She owned property, which was unusual. Then in the 1700s, when Abigail Adams asked her husband to “remember the ladies”, he laughed at her “extraordinary new code of laws”, and reminded her of her place. Hmmmm.

In 1878, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony trekked to Washington D.C. and introduced this radical amendment, eliciting giggles and guffaws.

And so it began and continued into the 1900s when Alice Paul and a galvanizing gaggle of gals picketed the White House; were (literally!) thrown into jail, went on hunger strikes, and SHAMED President Wilson, who ended the struggle in 1920 when Congress FINALLY signed the Nineteenth Amendment – AKA the Susan B. Anthony Amendment – into law.

Alice-Paul-01

Alice-Paul-02 Alice-Paul-03
Alice-Paul-04 Alice-Paul-06Alice Paul

THEN, in 1971, that fabulous Congresswoman from New York, Battling Bella Abzug tawked Congress into designating August 26th as Women’s Equality Day, commemorating suffrage!

Battling Bella Abzug

Battling Bella Abzug

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Mar 052015
 

MARCH 2015 Equal Pay, Hollywood-won’t and Herstoricals….

Hello She’s History! friends, fans and women’s history lovers!

It’s WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH, and as usual I have been quite busy in my never ending quest to turn peeps on to ALL the FABULOUS FEMALES we don’t know enough about!

Meryl Streep as Emmeline Pankhurst

Meryl Streep as Emmeline Pankhurst

Phillis Wheatley

Phillis Wheatley

Victoria Woodhull

Victoria Woodhull

shirley-chisholm

Speaking of fabulous, back in February, Boyhood actress Patricia Arquette won an Oscar and many hearts when she accepted her Best Supporting Actress award. But she did not accept the economic status of women, saying, “We have fought about everyone else’s rights. It’s about time we fought for our own; it’s about time we have equal pay and equal rights for women in the United States of America.” But she actually opened a can of worms initiating a heated and often times nasty discussion on intersectionality (or intersectionalism) which according to Wikipedia, is “the study of intersections between forms or systems of oppression, domination or discrimination”.

I had not heard of this term before (and I imagine Patricia Arquette had not either), but now many of us do, and that is a good thing. Let’s ALL learn. Women’s history is full oppression, domination and discrimination. When I heard Ms. Arquette make that statement, I immediately thought about the economic status of women, so let’s go there. Today women still earn only 77 cents to the man’s dollar; black women earn 64 cents, and Latina women earn 55 cents! Maria Shriver’s 2013 meticulously researched book on the status of some in our country, THE SHRIVER REPORT: A Woman’s Nation Pushed Back From The Brink, says it all, and it’s all pretty bad.

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Nov 222014
 

Well, here we are: November 2014.

Coming off the mid-term elections, we women did not fare very well AT ALL! But, let’s find the good. Alma Adams, a Democrat from North Carolina, becomes the 100th woman to serve in the Congress. Yay. But that’s all I got….

I am heartbroken to report that we had the lowest voter turnout in 72 years.This is tragic. As your resident Cultural Herstorian, I cannot help but think about another tragic November event. Back on November 15, 1917, Super Suffragist and all around Fabulous Female Alice Paul was arrested with a bunch of her sister suffragists for peacefully picketing in front of the White House for the right to vote. They were charged with obstructing sidewalk traffic and physically – literally – thrown into jail. It was called the Night Of Terror. And it was.

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